Month: August 2016

Art and Stories from Mughal India

Episode 47:  In the first half of the 15th Century (CE) Zahirrudin  Muhammad Barbur led his armies from Central Asia to decisive victories in battles at Panipat, Khanwa, and Ghagra on the Indian Sub-Continent.  Through these victories Barbur, who claimed a maternal descent from Genghis Khan and paternal descent through the Turco-Mongol conqueror Timur, established the foundation of the Mughal Empire, which would dominate large portions of present-day India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan for the next three-hundred years.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is presenting Art and Stories from Mughal India through October 23, 2016.  This exhibition presents works of art from this thoroughly fascinating historical era.  Brooke talks with Sonya Rhie Quintanilla, the Cleveland Museum of Art’s curator of Indian and Southeast Asian Art about this world-class exhibition.  Their conversation provides glimpses into the artistic expression of an empire that created the Taj Mahal, among countless other gifts to world culture, and which closely examined and attempted to reconcile Islam, Christianity, Hinduism and other religious traditions.

An excellent app dedicated to the exhibition is available on the App Store on Apple devices.  Search CMA Mughal in order to download a tour, a hundred images from the exhibition and an audio glossary.

Image 6. 2013.332_detailThe dream of Zulaykha, from the Amber Album, about 1670. Mughal India.  Opaque watercolor and gold on paper; 32 x 24.4 cm (page); 21.9 x 15.4 cm (painting).
The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection, 2013.332 (recto)

 

Image 5. 2013.351.a

 

Image 5. 2013.351.a_detail
Women enjoying the river at the forest’s edge, about 1765. Mughal India, Murshidabad or Lucknow. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper; 33.1 x 24.9 cm (page); 30.5 x 22.2 cm (painting). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection , 2013.351 (recto)
Image 4. 2013.325_detail
Nur Jahan holding a portrait of Emperor Jahangir, about 1627; borders added 1800s. Mughal India. Opaque watercolor and gold on paper; 30 x 22.1 cm (page); 13.6 x 6.4 cm (painting). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection, 2013.325 (recto).
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Layla and Majnun in the wilderness with animals, from a Khamsa (Quintet) of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi (Indian, 1253–1325), about 1590–1600. Attributed to Sanwalah (Indian, active about 1580–1600). Mughal India, made for Akbar (reigned 1556–1605). Opaque watercolor, ink, and gold on paper; 24.9 x 16.8 cm (page); 18.6 x 16.2 cm (painting). The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection, 2013.301 (recto).
Image 1. 2013.347.a
Posthumous portrait of the Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah (r. 1719–48)holding a falcon, 1764. Muhammad Rizavi Hindi (Indian, active mid-1700s). Mughal India, probably Lucknow. Opaque watercolor with gold on paper; 28 x 23.8 cm (page); 14.4 x 10.3 cm (painting).The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honor of Madeline NevesClapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection,2013.347 (recto)
Clockwise: Pierced railing, about 1655. Mughal India. Marble; 33.5 x 64 x 5.5 cm. Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, The Stuart Cary Welch Collection, Gift of Edith I. Welch in memory of Stuart Cary Welch, 2009.202.67. Image© President and Fellows of Harvard College
 Architectural panel, 1700s or early 1800s. Mughal India. Marble inlaid with variegated semiprecious stones; 46.4 x 24.4 x 7.5 cm. The Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Gary Smith, 86.189.4
 Ring, 1700s–1800s. India. Gold, enamel, and chased stones; diam. 2.3 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Edward L.Whittemore Fund ,1944.68
 Hookah bowl, about 1700. Mughal India. Gold on blue glass; h. 19.8 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cornelia Blakemore Warner Fund, 1961.44.
 Wine cup in the shape of a turban gourd, 1625–50. Mughal India. Nephrite. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection, B60J485. Photograph © Asian Art Museum of San Francisco.
Featured Image: The Annunciation, from a Mir’at al-quds (Mirror of Holiness) of Father Jerome Xavier (Spanish, 1549–1617), 1602–4. Mughal India, Allahabad, made for Prince Salim (1569–1627). Opaque watercolor, ink, and gold on paper; 26.2 x 15.4 cm (page); 20.6 x 10.2 cm (painting). The Cleveland Museum of Art, John L. Severance Fund, 2005.145.2.

 

 

Psychic Compound

Episode 46:  The C24 Gallery in New York City is featuring the creations of London artist Nick Gentry in an exhibition entitled Psychic Compound, which will run through September 2, 2016.  Gentry incorporates found objects such as film negatives, VHS tapes, X-rays, and floppy discs into his paintings; paintings that are not only striking portraiture but also thought provoking insight into the ever accelerating speed of technological innovation and obsolescence.

Brooke talked with Gentry and exhibition curator  Michelle Maigret about Psychic Compound, the inspiration for and influences on Gentry’s art, and about the arc of his career to this point.

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Lloyd Ney: Local Color

Episode 45:  The art of Lloyd Raymond “Bill” Ney (1893-1965) is far-ranging in terms of style, era, geography, subject and medium.  The Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, is presenting Lloyd Ney: Local Color, a showcase of Ney’s works, through September 11, 2016.  Ney, a native of nearby New Hope, Pennsylvania, travelled throughout the United States and the world, and participated in a variety of artistic scenes.  He was an outspoken Modernist, notable for his ambition and the controversies which marked his career.

Brooke talked to Louise Feder, assistant curator of the Michener Art Museum, about the exhibition.  Feder wrote her master’s thesis on Ney and in this interview she provides context for the artist and his art.  She also credits Ney’s family for preserving many of his works and for helping to maintain his legacy.

Programming at the Michener Art Museum includes a Curator’s Conversation and Gallery Talk on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, at 1 pm, and a Curator’s Lecture, on Wednesday, September 7, 2016, also at 1 pm.

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Lloyd Raymond Ney (1893-1965), Untitled Series, New London, Ohio, ca. 1954, oil on canvas, James A. Michener Art Museum. Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest.

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Lloyd Raymond Ney (1893-1965), Untitled Series, New London, Ohio, ca. 1954,                   oil on canvas, James A. Michener Art Museum. Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest.

Featured Image:  Lloyd Raymond Ney (1893-1965), Mechanic Street, New Hope, ca. 1934, oil on canvas, H. 30 x W. 36 inches. James A. Michener Art Museum. Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest.

Exalted Position

Episode 44 : What is art?  What gives an image meaning?  Exalted Position, which will run at the Peter Blum Gallery in Manhattan until August 31, 2016, suggests that an object can rise above its material status into the realm of the spiritual or the symbolic.  The exhibition features new works by artists Graham Durward, Irina Rozovsky, and Roger White.  Through their works these three artists offer entry points into the possibility of gleaning transcendent meaning out of mundane and ordinary moments.

Brooke has a casual, free-form conversation with curator Vlad Smolkin about Exalted Position, his career, and the Peter Blum Gallery.  The interview ends with Brooke describing her current writing project about early 20th century Irish art dealer Hugh Lane.

The Peter Blum Gallery is located at 20 West 57th Street, NYC, and the Exalted Position exhibition will run until the end of August, 2016.

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Graham Durward
The Place, 2016
oil on linen
80 x 42 inches (203.2 x 106.7 cm )

Irina Rozovsky
Untitled (from A Rock that Floats), 2014
Chromogenic color print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper
8 ½ x 13 ⅓ inches (21.6 x 34.3 cm)
Edition 1 0f 3 + 1 AP

Roger White
Silk Flowers (Third Version), 2016
oil on canvas
18 x 24 (45.72 x 60.96)

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.05.31

Irina Rozovsky
Untitled (from A Rock that Floats), 2014
Chromogenic color print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper
8 ½ x 13 ⅓ inches (21.6 x 34.3 cm)
Edition 1 0f 3 + 1 AP

 

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.05.01

Irina Rozovsky
Untitled (from ‘A Rock that Floats’), 2014
chromogenic color print on Kodak Portra Endura paper
6 1/2 x 9 3/4 inches (16.5 x 24.8 cm )

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.04.34

Irina Rozovsky
Untitled (from A Rock that Floats), 2015
chromogenic color print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper
11 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches (29.2 x 24.1 cm)
edition 1 of 3 + 1 AP

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.06.05

Roger White
Pink Mirror, 2015
oil on canvas
36 x 36 inches (91.44 x 91.44 cm )

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.03.02

Roger White
Windows, 2015
oil on canvas
66 x 44 inches (167.6 x 111.8 cm )

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.01.40

Graham Durward
Small Smoke, 2016
oil on linen
48 x 36 inches (121.92 x 91.44 cm)

Screenshot 2016-08-16 02.00.45

Graham Durward
Split Screen Red, 2014
oil on canvas
80 x 24 inches (203.2 x 61 cm)

Featured Images:
Graham Durward
Harlequin DJ, 2016
oil on linen
82 x 58 inches (208.3 x 147.3 cm)

Irina Rozovsky
Untitled (from A Rock that Floats), 2014
chromogenic color print on Kodak Portra Endura paper
11 3/4 x 8 1/4 inches (29.8 x 21 cm)
edition 1 of 3 + AP

 

All images used with permission c. Peter Blum Gallery

No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting

Episode 43:  Canvases that manifest an art tradition going back tens of thousands of years. Brooke talks with Henry Skerritt, the curator of No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting, which will be at the Cornell University Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art in Ithaca, New York until August 14, 2016.  Skerritt explains how the paintings in this exhibition reflect a genre that has traditionally been ceremonial and impermanent.  Although the artists that are featured in No Boundaries have created works that are hung in museums and private collections all over the world, the art is more about the process than the product. All nine showcased artists paint in full awareness that each viewer’s experience with a work of art will be unique from that of the artist.

Henry Skerritt, in addition to being a curator, is also an art historian and songwriter, and is currently a doctoral candidate in the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh.  He originally hails from Perth in Western Australia and his knowledge of and passion for Aboriginal Australian art provide insight into a genre that is in many ways different from other world art traditions.

HFJ-NB-2L-iiiDavid O. Brown/Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

 

HFJ-NB-2L-iiDavid O. Brown/Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

HFJ-NB-2L-iDavid O. Brown/Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

HFJ-NB-1L-iiDavid O. Brown/Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

 

Featured Image: David O. Brown/Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

Identity

Episode 41:  Who are you?  Who am I?  Who is that?  Identity in American culture is often as much about how an individual presents himself or herself as it about how that person’s identity is externally determined.  Brooke talks with associate curator Maggie Adler of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas about Identity, an exhibition which explores community, celebrity and individual identity through portraiture from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection. The exhibition highlights the exciting new acquisitions of Sedrick Huckaby’s The 99% and Glenn Ligon’s print series Runaways. Their works – in combination with prints and photographs of and by public figures such as Marilyn Monroe, Martin Luther King, Jr., and and Georgia O’Keeffe – show the various personas individuals adopt.  Together, these portraits represent the fluid and constantly shifting role of identity in society from the twentieth to the twenty-first century. Identity runs until October 9, 2016.

2002-13_sMervin Jules (1912–1994)
Martin Luther King Jr, ca. 1963–68
Woodcut
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John Richardson Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas

p1965-161_sEdward Weston (1886–1958)

James Cagney, 1933

Gelatin silver print
© 1981 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas

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Sedrick Huckaby (b. 1975)

#075 Oliver Spar’s Daughter (I Go to O.D. Wyatt), 2012–13
From The 99%—Highland Hills
Lithograph
© 2013 Sedrick Huckaby
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas

2015-4-73_sSedrick Huckaby (b. 1975)
#073 Neighbor, 2012–13
From The 99%—Highland Hills
Lithograph
© 2013 Sedrick Huckaby
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas

2015-4-28_prSedrick Huckaby (b. 1975)
#028 Vic, 2012–13
From The 99%—Highland Hills
Lithograph
© 2013 Sedrick Huckaby
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas

Featured Image:

Glenn Ligon (b. 1960)
Runaways [2 of 10], 1993
Lithograph
© Glenn Ligon; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Thomas Dane Gallery, London
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas